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Humanities & Social Sciences

Sociology

  • A Level
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Overview

The fascination of sociology lies in the fact that it makes us see, in a new light, the very world in which we have lived all our lives. It can be said that the first wisdom of sociology is things are not what they seem. If you are interested in our society and want to find out why things such as inequality exist this course will interest you. If you have a curiosity about human beings and their lives you will find sociology interesting and rewarding. Sociology prepares you for a lifetime of change, developing an appreciation of diversity, love of learning, writing and study skills, as well as a knowledge base about human behaviour, social organisation and culture.

Sociology will help you understand the connection between culture, identity and behaviour, why people stereotype and judge each other, and how society affects our life chances and futures. As a subject it suits students who can see things from more than one point of view and who can present arguments well. It is particularly useful for students who are studying subjects such as Law, Psychology, Business Studies, English, Media, Communication and Culture, History and Religious Studies.

What will you learn?

A breakdown of what you will cover during this course is as follows:

Unit 1: Socialisation, culture and identity

An introduction to the key themes of socialisation, culture and identity which develops these themes through the context of one of three options. These options develop skills that enable you to focus on personal identity, roles and responsibilities within society and to develop a lifelong interest in social issues.

Section A: Introducing socialisation, culture and identity

• What is culture?

• What is socialisation?

• What is identity?

Section B: Option

• Youth subcultures

Unit 2: Researching and understanding social inequalities

You will gain knowledge and understanding of contemporary social processes and social change in the context of social inequality and difference. You will develop understanding of the links between the nature of sociological thought and the methods of sociological enquiry.

Section A: Research methods and researching social inequalities

• What is the relationship between theory and methods?

• What are the main stages of the research process?

• Which methods are used in sociological research?

Section B: Understanding social inequalities

• What are the main patterns and trends in social inequality and difference?

• How can patterns and trends in social inequality and difference be explained?

Unit 3: Debates in contemporary society

You will look at the relationship between globalisation and digital forms of communication, as well as the impact of digital forms of communication in a global context.

Section A: This section provides you with the opportunity to consider developments in digital forms of communication within global society and how these developments are related to social capital. You will gain an overview of how Marxists, feminists and postmodernists view digital forms of communication and the impact of digital social communication – whether this is on people’s identity, social inequalities or relationships. You will also consider the impact on culture in terms of conflict and change, cultural homogenisation and culture defence.

Section B: Crime and deviance (this also includes a global aspect).

Who is the course aimed at?

This course is for you if you are interested in our society and want to find out why things such as inequality exist. It will suit you if you are able to see things from more than one point of view and can present arguments well. It is particularly useful for students who are studying subjects such as Law, Psychology, Business Studies, English, Media, Communication and Culture, History and Religious Studies.

Entry Requirements & Other Info
  • Entry Requirements Arrow down

    You must have a minimum of five GCSE grades 9-4 and a GCSE average of 5.3 or more. You should also have a grade 4 or higher in GCSE English Language.

  • Experiences Arrow down

    This course will provide you with the opportunity to explore Sociology in practice. Past trips have included the Whitby Goth and Steampunk Festival and visits to leading universities. You will also get the chance to take part in workshops and talks from visitors and academics, which will help to enhance your learning even further.

  • Progression Arrow down

    Sociology is an all-rounder subject, helping you to understand the people around you. It’s a good basis for those looking at studying Sociology, Ethics, Psychology, Teaching and Marketing, as well as many more, at university. It also lends itself well to apprenticeships, particularly those in public services or healthcare.

  • Outcomes Arrow down

    Students who complete a qualification in Sociology go on to a wide variety of jobs. These can include: Advice Worker, Police Officer, Youth Worker, Journalist, Charity Officer or Teacher, to name a few.

Upcoming Events

10 Dec 22 Future Student Saturday
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17 Jan 23 Creative and Arts Event
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09 Feb 23 Crime and Legal Event
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Future Student Saturday

Saturday 10 December 2022

This is a fantastic opportunity to see first-hand why Wilberforce College is the right choice for you. Bring along parents/guardians, family and friends on Saturday 10 December, 9am-12pm and learn a little more about our award-winning College. Listen to talks, take part in tours and have the chance to see our fantastic study spaces, state-of-the-art labs, performance spaces and industry standard salons, with subject specialists on hand to answer any questions.

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